Championships are amazing. Enjoy them.

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Championships are amazing. Enjoy them.

Fans watch a World Series game on the Nationals Park jumbotron. The Nationals defeated the Houston Astros 4 games to 3 to win the World Series. Photo by Sam Mostow.

Fans watch a World Series game on the Nationals Park jumbotron. The Nationals defeated the Houston Astros 4 games to 3 to win the World Series. Photo by Sam Mostow.

Fans watch a World Series game on the Nationals Park jumbotron. The Nationals defeated the Houston Astros 4 games to 3 to win the World Series. Photo by Sam Mostow.

Fans watch a World Series game on the Nationals Park jumbotron. The Nationals defeated the Houston Astros 4 games to 3 to win the World Series. Photo by Sam Mostow.

Sam Mostow, Staff Reporter

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In the sixth inning, I declared the Nationals dead during the Game 7 winner-take-all game against the Astros.

I’m notoriously pessimistic, and I recognize that, but in retrospect, this was a new low. Houston Astros starting pitcher Zack Greinke looked immortal through six innings. Washington Nationals pitcher Max Scherzer didn’t look very good, the Astros had a two-run lead, and I panicked. My heart sunk in my chest at Nationals Park, thinking this was just another in a long series of heartbreaks. I tried to soften the blow by admitting defeat and counting down the days until pitchers and catchers report to Spring Training in February.

Man, was I wrong.

What happened over the span of the next hour and a half is still a blur to me. Nationals third baseman Anthony Rendon hit a home run off of Zack Greinke, who began to slowly look mortal. Astros manager AJ Hinch clearly saw what all 16,000 fans at Nationals Park and the millions watching elsewhere saw and pulled him. With a runner on base, designated hitter Howie Kendrick hit the baseball 336 feet to hit the foul pole in right field, and suddenly, the Nationals had the lead. They never looked back after that, winning 6-2. 

Nationals reliever Daniel Hudson struck out Astros left fielder Michael Brantley on a 3-2 count, and suddenly, the city of Washington had its first World Series in 95 years. 

Washington rejoiced. All 16,000 fans at Nationals Park and the thousands more lined up outside hugged their family and friends while singing Queen’s “We Are The Champions.” There were fireworks lit on every block. People were screaming and crying and singing and dancing in the streets. It was mayhem. 

This wasn’t the first time a DC team had won a championship after many years of heartbreak and failure. 510 days earlier, the NHL’s Washington Capitals won the Stanley Cup for the first time in their 44 year history. Their Stanley Cup run was perhaps known for their celebrations. They did keg stands out of the Stanley Cup, drunkenly paraded through the streets of DC, and swam shirtless in the Georgetown fountain.

The WNBA’s Washington Mystics were somewhat the same when they won the WNBA Finals earlier this fall. However, they are a relatively young team, and never had a massive drought of championship-less seasons.

There’s no telling what the Nationals are going to do in the coming weeks. They have a parade down Constitution Avenue and Pennsylvania Avenue scheduled for Saturday. It can be assumed that some of the players will be making appearances at Capitals, Wizards, and Redskins games in the next few days, World Series trophy in hand. But there is one thing that we can be certain about: no matter what happens, it will be fun. 

Enjoy it for all its worth.